January 30, 2016

The Shepherd's Corner

THE SHEPHERD’S CORNER

God does not leave any stones unturned. Even when we come to Him for help, He still uses the occasion to make us see more clearly—sometimes to see Him more clearly, sometimes to see us more clearly. That was what Jesus Our Lord did to Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, as recorded in Mark 10:46-52. THE SHEPHERD’S CORNER

God does not leave any stones unturned. Even when we come to Him for help, He still uses the occasion to make us see more clearly—sometimes to see Him more clearly, sometimes to see us more clearly. That was what Jesus Our Lord did to Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, as recorded in Mark 10:46-52.

Even though Bartimaeus only cried out for mercy, it was obvious that he was asking for healing—to be able to see. But, Jesus Our Savior still asked, “What do you want me to do for you?” There are at least two explanations as to why He asked that question. The first is, perhaps He wanted Bartimaeus to be specific. In his book, “With Christ in the School of Prayer,” Andrew Murray explains, “He wanted to hear not only the general petition for mercy, but the distinct expression of what the man’s desire was that day.”

I know why at times I do not ask God for something in specifics: I am afraid of rejection! A general and vague request becomes a hiding place in case God decides not to answer my prayer. Words like, “Whatever Your will is,” substitutes what I really want and expect from Our Loving God. You see, He wants us to be specific because specific requests demonstrate a bold faith—no shame, only trust.

The second explanation is, Andrew Murray explains, He wants to teach us “to know our own needs better.” And, it requires “time, thought, and self-scrutiny” to learn what the needs are. I notice there are times God deliberately holds His answers and makes me repeat my prayers so I can look at the underlying motives. Once I know my motives, I can be more, not only specific, but also accurate. And, there are times I don’t even bother to ask anymore because I find out that the motives are out of line with God’s will.

Pastor Paul

Even though Bartimaeus only cried out for mercy, it was obvious that he was asking for healing—to be able to see. But, Jesus Our Savior still asked, “What do you want me to do for you?” There are at least two explanations as to why He asked that question. The first is, perhaps He wanted Bartimaeus to be specific. In his book, “With Christ in the School of Prayer,” Andrew Murray explains, “He wanted to hear not only the general petition for mercy, but the distinct expression of what the man’s desire was that day.”

I know why at times I do not ask God for something in specifics: I am afraid of rejection! A general and vague request becomes a hiding place in case God decides not to answer my prayer. Words like, “Whatever Your will is,” substitutes what I really want and expect from Our Loving God. You see, He wants us to be specific because specific requests demonstrate a bold faith—no shame, only trust.

The second explanation is, Andrew Murray explains, He wants to teach us “to know our own needs better.” And, it requires “time, thought, and self-scrutiny” to learn what the needs are. I notice there are times God deliberately holds His answers and makes me repeat my prayers so I can look at the underlying motives. Once I know my motives, I can be more, not only specific, but also accurate. And, there are times I don’t even bother to ask anymore because I find out that the motives are out of line with God’s will.

Pastor Paul

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