January 16, 2016

The Shepherd's Corner

THE SHEPHERD’S CORNER

Character is difficult to change once it is already in place. It is like a Christmas tree—or any tree for that matter. We can hang as many Christmas ornaments as we want and even cover it with snow—real or frocked—to the point that we can barely see its green leaves, but there is still going to be a Christmas tree . . . somewhere. It goes the same with character. We can adorn it with ornaments or cover it with acts, deep inside there is still that real character.THE SHEPHERD’S CORNER

Character is difficult to change once it is already in place. It is like a Christmas tree—or any tree for that matter. We can hang as many Christmas ornaments as we want and even cover it with snow—real or frocked—to the point that we can barely see its green leaves, but there is still going to be a Christmas tree . . . somewhere. It goes the same with character. We can adorn it with ornaments or cover it with acts, deep inside there is still that real character.

Character-building begins with integrity—transparency and consistency. Who we are inside is who we are outside—that’s transparency. Who we were yesterday at home is who we are today at church—that’s consistency. To grow character, then, we must begin with integrity—to be where we are at today, inside and out. Without integrity, there will be no character development.

Dr. James Houston, professor of theology at Regents College, Canada, has something to say about character and integrity, “My problem is that I can think faster than I can speak, I speak faster than I can act, I’ve got more acts that I’ve got character for . . . so maintaining integrity is acting appropriately.” Indirectly he is saying that character develops slowly, we cannot speed it up. We can only hang ornaments or cover it with snow.

I must say that you have cultivated an atmosphere of acceptance here, whereby everyone can act appropriately and where transparency and consistency are encouraged, not frowned upon. There is no pressure to be someone else; everyone is accepted just as he or she is. Without your realizing it, you have actually created an environment where integrity can grow. It is little wonder that I have witnessed characters grow. Thank you. Please keep it as it is.

Pastor Paul

Character-building begins with integrity—transparency and consistency. Who we are inside is who we are outside—that’s transparency. Who we were yesterday at home is who we are today at church—that’s consistency. To grow character, then, we must begin with integrity—to be where we are at today, inside and out. Without integrity, there will be no character development.

Dr. James Houston, professor of theology at Regents College, Canada, has something to say about character and integrity, “My problem is that I can think faster than I can speak, I speak faster than I can act, I’ve got more acts that I’ve got character for . . . so maintaining integrity is acting appropriately.” Indirectly he is saying that character develops slowly, we cannot speed it up. We can only hang ornaments or cover it with snow.

I must say that you have cultivated an atmosphere of acceptance here, whereby everyone can act appropriately and where transparency and consistency are encouraged, not frowned upon. There is no pressure to be someone else; everyone is accepted just as he or she is. Without your realizing it, you have actually created an environment where integrity can grow. It is little wonder that I have witnessed characters grow. Thank you. Please keep it as it is.

Pastor Paul

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